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In Lena's World

"I am a regular Staples customer, which can be confirmed as I have a rewards card membership. I not only buy my office and school supplies but use your printing services. Your employees are great and represent Staples well. Don’t cheat them out of hours to avoid health care. It’s not a good approach to maintain employee loyalty & morale which is the reason I get such good service." - David K. from Albuquerque, NM

She's a beauty and a geek: Supermodel is a coder

womenrockscience:

Black Women Earn A lot of Degrees

kathrynfinney:

Interesting stats on the percentage of people of color earning degrees by race and gender. A higher percentage of Black women earn Bachelors and Masters Degrees than any other race, while a higher percentage of Asian women earn Ph.D.  Fascinating graphics

The Impact of Few (like less than 3%) of the Black High School Students Taking the AP CS Exam

kathrynfinney:

Tomorrow, I will be on ABC/Fusion chatting about the impact of so few black and latino high school students taking the AP CS exam. Approximately 3% of the 30,000 students taking the exam were black and in 11 states, including Mississippi whose population is over 37% black, NO black student took the exam. None. Zero. I can only speculate of that 3%, how many black girls took the exam.

Now there’s a bunch of reasons for this: AP classes are usually taught more  in suburban and wealthy communities, there’s not many teachers who know enough about CS to actually teach a college level course, etc, etc.

However the impact of so few black (and latino) students gaining access to the basics of coding is scary. For example:

1. Where’s the Pipeline. Most folks get interested in programming and coding as teens. If black students aren’t exposed, by the time they reach college they will be several steps behind their white counterparts and with tech moving so fast, it will be hard (and frustrating) to try and catch up. It’s the reason why many drop out.

2. Ideas are lost. Kids in the hood have awesome ideas (hip-hop, sneakers, mobile), but these ideas won’t see the light of day because these kids won’t have the tools to be creators. So their ideas will be monetized by someone else (hello Rap Genius).

 So what’s the answer? Programs like Black Girls Code are important (full disclosure: my husband and I are financial supporters of the program).

However, kids emulate the adults in their lives and frankly few black adults know anything about tech. It’s time for us old folks (anyone over 22 years old) to STOP passing the buck to the younger generation and LEARN TO CODE ourselves or, at least, become as active in our kids tech lives as we are in the church (yes, I said it). Learn how to use facebook correctly, spend time with your child on the computer (or better yet ask them to teach you how to use Snapchat or Whisper), start a blog, seek out tech events in your area and ATTEND WITH YOUR CHILDREN.

Stop yelling/belittling your children for being curious. We’ve created a culture where curiosity has become a bad word. I get why, back in the day you could be killed for being too curious, however in an effort to protect ourselves we’ve shifted out the very thing that would help us succeed in this new economy.

To paraphrase a popular saying… “Be the coder you want your child to be”

fastcompany:

By now, we’re all familiar with the idea of wearable health trackers. But we’re used to seeing them on our wrists. If Google gets its way, the next batch of wearables may be worn in your eyes.
The company’s experimental wing, Google[x], announced on Thursday its plan to test a prototype of a smart contact lens that would monitor the sugar levels of diabetes patients, possibly alerting them when glucose levels become dangerously high or low.
Google is making a smart contact lens

fastcompany:

By now, we’re all familiar with the idea of wearable health trackers. But we’re used to seeing them on our wrists. If Google gets its way, the next batch of wearables may be worn in your eyes.

The company’s experimental wing, Google[x], announced on Thursday its plan to test a prototype of a smart contact lens that would monitor the sugar levels of diabetes patients, possibly alerting them when glucose levels become dangerously high or low.

Google is making a smart contact lens

30 Under 30: The Young Scientists And Entrepreneurs Discovering Our Future - Divya Nag, 22

womenrockscience:

Omg she’s only 22, watch the interview, she dropped out of Stanford to pursue her dreams. Is it inappropriate for me to say I love her trousers?

pbsthisdayinhistory:

January 15, 1929 : Martin Luther King Jr. is Born
On this day in 1929, Martln Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta, Georgia. Celebrate Martin Luther King Jr.’s contributions to civil rights and equality from the PBS Black Culture Connection: http://to.pbs.org/1eH4KCi
Photo: 1964 portrait of Martin Luther King Jr. (Library of Congress)

pbsthisdayinhistory:

January 15, 1929 : Martin Luther King Jr. is Born

On this day in 1929, Martln Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta, Georgia. Celebrate Martin Luther King Jr.’s contributions to civil rights and equality from the PBS Black Culture Connection: http://to.pbs.org/1eH4KCi

Photo: 1964 portrait of Martin Luther King Jr. (Library of Congress)

(Source: loc.gov)

libraryadvocates:

By asking, “What does a computer engineer look like?” Kimberly Bryant, founder of Black Girls Code, shows how the digital divide has widened between genders. Bryant stresses why it’s important to encourage girls of color to get into computer science.

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